Editorial Page

NIL Improves Financial Future For Student Athletes

September 20, 2021,

It is about time.

Young student athletes can finally make money off of their name, images and likeness.

The horror stories of the past are too numerous to chronicle here.

We remember tales of elite college football players who didn’t have enough food to eat by the end of the month to a former UCLA basketball standout who, after college, was working in a car dealership while a video company was making millions off of his image and he wasn’t receiving a dime.

Football programs received extreme sanctions if struggling college students received a payoff from a booster. Meanwhile the universities and college coaches are raking in millions.

So much of it spoke to complete hypocrisy.

Jubilation. That is all changing.

fcielitecompetitor.com fciwomenswrestling2.com articles, Kampus-Production-pexels.com-photo-credit

As reported by ESPN (espn.com), “College sports is in the midst of its most significant changes in a generation. A mixture of new state laws and NCAA rules changes that went into effect on July 1 have provided athletes with varying degrees of new protections and opportunities to make money by selling their name, image and likeness (NIL) rights.”

And you thought student athletes were partying before?

It is time for a massive celebration.

fcielitecompetitor.com fciwomenswrestling2.com articles, Pixabay.com-pexels.com-photo-credit.

On June 30, 2021, the NCAA is reporting about it as well but we sense probably not with the same amount of enthusiasm. They educate at ncaa.org, “NCAA college athletes will have the opportunity to benefit from their name, image and likeness beginning Thursday. Governance bodies in all three divisions today adopted a uniform interim policy suspending NCAA name, image and likeness rules for all incoming and current student-athletes in all sports.”

They continue:

The policy provides the following guidance to college athletes, recruits, their families and member schools:

  • Individuals can engage in NIL activities that are consistent with the law of the state where the school is located. Colleges and universities may be a resource for state law questions.
  • College athletes who attend a school in a state without an NIL law can engage in this type of activity without violating NCAA rules related to name, image and likeness.
  • Individuals can use a professional services provider for NIL activities.
  • Student-athletes should report NIL activities consistent with state law or school and conference requirements to their school.

Change at times does come slowly but eventually the hope is what is right will win out.

The opportunities for student athletes are pouring in and here is one of them.

NCAA Athletes Partner with CoachTube to Earn Money from Name, Image, Likeness by Producing Original Training Courses

fcielitecompetitor.com fciwomenswrestling2.com articles, CoachTube-photo-credit-Editorial-use

Select student athletes now have the same opportunity as elite coaches to earn money on the largest platform for online sports training and instruction.

News provided by

CoachTube

Aug 25, 2021, 11:16 ET

AUSTIN, Texas, Aug. 25, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — CoachTube, the largest platform to teach and learn sports from the most notable names in coaching, today announced that it will now offer courses from top student athletes in a variety of sports. In turn, rising athletes finally have a lucrative way to earn money from their Name, Image, and Likeness (NIL) thanks to recent NCAA rule changes. College stars from powerhouse sports programs at Clemson, Oklahoma, Texas, Georgia, and Miami are already taking advantage of this NCAA shift.

CoachTube’s library includes nearly 5,000 courses from over 1,300 seasoned coaches and athletes, including top trainers from NCAA, NFL, and nearly every NBA team. CoachTube has helped those instructors collectively earn millions in revenue since launching. More than 10,000 courses are booked on the platform every month, featuring training across 50+ sports — everything from football and basketball to e-sports and disc golf.

Dozens of hand-picked student athletes have joined the CoachTube platform at launch, including Kansas basketball and All Big 12 player Jalen Wilson, Notre Dame running back Kyren Williams, Clemson wide receiver EJ Williams, Georgia wide receiver Arik Gilbert, Northwestern consensus All-American safety Brandon Joseph, and Miami offensive lineman Zion Nelson. In addition to producing video channels meant to help younger players reach their full potential in the sport they love, collegiate athletes have access to all the training tools available on the platform, like a Q&A feature allowing trainees to ask specific questions about particular lessons, adding graphics and annotations to immersive videos, and more.

“The goal is to be the No. 1 revenue source for student athletes,” said CoachTube founder and CEO Wade Floyd. “We built CoachTube to empower coaches and athletes to succeed, not exploit their brand for profit. I can’t think of a better way for athletes to make money off their name, image, and likeness, than to teach what they love to those who look up to them.”

Student athletes, like other instructors, have full control over managing their content, customers, and how their NIL is used. They set prices for both individual lessons as well as course bundles, which can include training manuals, quizzes, and 1-on-1 sessions in addition to videos. The company, which acts as a support team, foots the initial cost for producing high quality video lessons and allows student athletes to retain ownership of instructional content in exchange for collecting a fee for anything sold on its platform. CoachTube also gives them access to customer data and sales analytics to maximize both revenue and the impact of their promotional efforts.

“There couldn’t be a better opportunity to grow my brand than partnering with CoachTube to share what I know,” said FSU track & field star Trey Cunningham. “I wish there was content and expert training readily available when I was starting out hurdling.”

“I created training courses because I wanted to demonstrate my knowledge of the game in a way that helps other student athletes like me get better,” said Texas A&M women’s basketball guard Kayla Wells. “CoachTube is a great platform with tools and useful data that lets me reach so many athletes easily.”

CoachTube, which recently closed a new round of funding led by Tim Draper, plans to add dozens more notable student athletes across all sports and many top tier universities in the coming months. For a full list of student athlete courses, visit: coachtube.com/courses/student-athletes

About CoachTube
CoachTube is the largest platform for elite-level coaches to offer instructional courses to coaches and future all-star athletes. Over 1,300 coaches and notable athletes have produced nearly 5,000 courses covering 50+ sports, including everything from football and basketball to fencing. CoachTube intends to be the No. 1 revenue source for top tier coaches and student athletes by providing a platform with tools that help its instructors grow their audience, brand, and revenue. Founded in 2015, the sports education platform is based in Austin, Texas.

Press Contact:

Tom Cheredar
Media Relations
317391@email4pr.com
coachtube.com/about

SOURCE CoachTube

OPENING PHOTO fcielitecompetitor.com fciwomenswrestling2.com articles, grapplingstars.com femcompetitor.com Pavel-Danilyuk-pexels.com-photo-credit.

https://www.espn.com/college-sports/story/_/id/31086019/everything-need-know-ncaa-nil-debate

https://www.ncaa.org/about/resources/media-center/news/ncaa-adopts-interim-name-image-and-likeness-policy

https://femcompetitor.com/

https://grapplingstars.com/

https://www.fcielitecompetitor.com/

https://fciwomenswrestling.com/

 

 

You may also like...